Depressed or anxious teens risk heart attacks in middle age and More…

In today’s digest we bring you articles on Depressed or anxious teens risk heart attacks in middle age, System Athletica and Dynamic Isometric training, Mild Oxygen Hyperbaric Therapy at the Stevenson’s & what does it do? and Why you gotta bounce. Hope you enjoy them…

Depressed or anxious teens risk heart attacks in middle age

Depression or anxiety in adolescence is linked with a 20% greater likelihood of having a heart attack mid-life, according to research released today at ESC Congress 2020.1 In a warning to parents, study author Dr. Cecilia Bergh of Örebro University in Sweden, said: “Be vigilant and look for signs of stress, depression or anxiety that […]

Depression or anxiety in adolescence is linked with a 20% greater likelihood of having a heart attack mid-life, according to research released today at ESC Congress 2020.1

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In today’s digest we bring you articles on Depressed or anxious teens risk heart attacks in middle age, System Athletica and Dynamic Isometric training, Mild Oxygen Hyperbaric Therapy at the Stevenson’s & what does it do? and Why you gotta bounce. Hope you enjoy them…

Depressed or anxious teens risk heart attacks in middle age

Depression or anxiety in adolescence is linked with a 20% greater likelihood of having a heart attack mid-life, according to research released today at ESC Congress 2020.1 In a warning to parents, study author Dr. Cecilia Bergh of Örebro University in Sweden, said: “Be vigilant and look for signs of stress, depression or anxiety that […]

Depression or anxiety in adolescence is linked with a 20% greater likelihood of having a heart attack mid-life, according to research released today at ESC Congress 2020.1

In a warning to parents, study author Dr. Cecilia Bergh of Örebro University in Sweden, said: “Be vigilant and look for signs of stress, depression or anxiety that is beyond the normal teenage angst: seek help if there seems to be a persistent problem (telephone helplines may be particularly helpful during the COVID-19 pandemic). If a healthy lifestyle is encouraged as early as possible in childhood and adolescence it is more likely to persist into adulthood and improve long-term health.”

There are indications that mental well-being is declining in young people. This study investigated whether conditions like depression in adolescence (age 18 or 19) are associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular disease in adulthood. The researchers also examined the possible role of stress resilience (ability to cope with stress in everyday life) in helping to explain any associations.

The study included 238,013 men born between 1952 and 1956 who underwent extensive examinations in late adolescence (as part of their assessment for compulsory military service) and were then followed into middle age (up to the age of 58 years). The assessments at the age of 18 or 19 years included medical, psychiatric, and physical examinations by physicians and psychologists.

Stress resilience was measured by an interview with a psychologist and a questionnaire, and based on familial, medical, social, behavioural and personality characteristics.

A total of 34,503 men were diagnosed with a non-psychotic mental disorder (such as depression or anxiety) at conscription. Follow-up for cardiovascular disease was through hospital medical records.

The study found that a mental disorder in adolescence was associated with the risk of having a myocardial infarction (heart attack) by middle age. Compared to men without a mental illness in adolescence, the risk of myocardial infarction was 20% higher among men with a diagnosis — even after taking into account other characteristics in adolescence such as blood pressure, body mass index, general health, and parental socioeconomic status.

The association between mental illness and heart attack was partly — but not completely — explained by poorer stress resilience and lower physical ?tness in teenagers with a mental illness. “We already knew that men who were physically fit in adolescence seem less likely to maintain fitness in later years if they have low stress resilience,” said Dr. Bergh. “Our previous research has also shown that low stress resilience is also coupled with a greater tendency towards addictive behaviour, signalled by higher risks of smoking, alcohol consumption and other drug use.”

Dr. Bergh said: “Better fitness in adolescence is likely to help protect against later heart disease, particularly if people stay fit as they age. Physical activity may also alleviate some of the negative consequences of stress. This is relevant to all adolescents, but those with poorer wellbeing could benefit from additional support to encourage exercise and to develop strategies to deal with stress.”

Story Source:

Materials provided by European Society of Cardiology. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.



Depressed or anxious teens risk heart attacks in middle age was originally published at LINK


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System Athletica and Dynamic Isometric training

Check out this track from System Athletica which offers an uncommon training technology referred to as dynamic isometrics. This style of movement stimulates the brain through co-ordination, agility, timing, footwork (the dynamic principles) and works the physiology through progressive overload (isometrics) not to mention the overabundance of the squat and lunge primal patterns which are […]

Check out this track from System Athletica which offers an uncommon training technology referred to as dynamic isometrics. This style of movement stimulates the brain through co-ordination, agility, timing, footwork (the dynamic principles) and works the physiology through progressive overload (isometrics) not to mention the overabundance of the squat and lunge primal patterns which are done without spinal compression. As we get older we get slower, our footwork ability decreases, our coordination diminishes and our ability to “fire” certain muscle groups “at will” heads south as well. If you are serious about your movement future forget the vanity style training and do yourself a favour, add these tracks to your routine and notice the benefits. Things like stair climbing, getting out of bed easier, decreased lower back issues from compression, increased neurological adaptation to coordinating your feet under your body are all common feedback we have received over the 10+ tears we have been sharing this style with participants. Oh and by the way, if you do this stuff at a good level, you will see great muscular benefits as well, so the vanity muscles become part of the natural process. Have fun!

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System Athletica and Dynamic Isometric training was originally published at LINK


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Mild Oxygen Hyperbaric Therapy at the Stevenson’s & what does it do?

In our quest to maintain great health for ourselves and our trainees, we invested in a Mild Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy chamber (MHBOT). I first saw one of these at a fitness convention in 2004 and wanted one there and then, but when I tried to finance it I was knocked back because I was a […]

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In our quest to maintain great health for ourselves and our trainees, we invested in a Mild Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy chamber (MHBOT). I first saw one of these at a fitness convention in 2004 and wanted one there and then, but when I tried to finance it I was knocked back because I was a broke personal trainer in a new city. Fast forward to today and I am “livin la vida loca” with my HBOT.

Basically when you sit in a pressured environment with an increased (pure) oxygen supply, your body reorganizes itself on a cellular activity by up-regulating anti-inflammatory genes and down-regulating inflammatory genes. The pressure acts as a gas and because our body is made up of gasses on a microscopic scale, every cell must contract giving a “workout” response on a cellular level. As we know from the training cycle, the body runs on oxygen, so when we saturate the body with oxygen, we are ultimately giving our cells a nice mild workout with excellent hydration.

Some of the results from using MHBOT are amazing and seem to be full of it (B.S) – but who am I to disregard another persons tangible result if they are living proof of the process working? I will only ever share what I have seen with my eyes and the results I have felt are the following – which I CANNOT say are placebo or not – however I do not care, I just know they happened since using the chamber.

  • Better sleep – more restful. Ease of getting TO sleep is arguable, I think I go down heavier but there is a touch of increased mental activity before sleep kicks in but I have been getting up less during the night – again I am not sure if this is the chamber but I can say with confidence my sleep has been effected positively.

  • Faster recovery from training, this this is a text book response due to the anti inflammatory nature of the therapy but It is only subtle. I notice it because I have done 100’s of thousands of hours of training so yes it works.

  • Old joint pains started lessening. I have knee issues from poor athletic form in my teens and early 20’s and have persistently tried to “fix” them non-surgically for the past 15 years. I can say with confidence that my knees have been getting progressively better. Deep squatting was a trip down knee burn lane but since using the chamber I have slowly gained confidence and can hit rock bottom again with half the burn I used to feel – and it is getting better as the weeks go by. Please note this was progressive. I did feel a marked improvement after my first session though.

  • Strength increase – weight lifting capacity went up. Plain and simple I got a 5% strength increase in a few weeks. Did I actually get “stronger” or was it because my body feels better so my trust in it to operate at high levels increased? I don’t know but it happened, and if you know me you will know I am very careful with weight lifting so a 5% increase is huge.

  • Mental clarity – this is a big one, I take in tremendous amounts of info every day from multiple sources and I often found myself stuttering and sometimes stumbling mid sentence like my words couldn’t catch up with my thought and since using the chamber this has changed big time. I feel mentally sharper is the best way to explain it.

  • Energy and fatigue cycles are more noticeable. Another strange one, they all spout about the energy high you get but no-one says anything about the fatigue. I find myself getting very tired when sleep time rolls around. Training felt different in the beginning too, I felt myself fatiguing faster because my output went up which was not expected. Felt like not being fit which was humbling and interesting at the same time.

  • Increased sense of well-being. I see this word combination (“well being”) around a lot and often wonder what the heck it actually means to the point it seems like a BS euphemism, but I will use it here in this context because I cannot explain this effect any other way. I am sometimes a grumpy bugger who can be somewhat asocial, this is something I work on constantly so to feel “nicer” without having to remember to be was something that stuck out. I have noticed a marked improvement to my overall sense of feeling “good”. This is not to say that feeling “bad” does not happen anymore – of course it does – but you really notice it when it does. To me this is a good thing.

So these are the biggest things that have happened to me with regular usage. I try to use it every day for about 70 minutes and find with each session the benefits I have just mentioned subtly amplify and last. I am not sure how long random session effects last – an interesting side-note is when people are asked about whether it “works” or not is they often do not initially notice the differences. It is the husband/wife/kids/etc that notice the changers more than the individual which I always find fascinating. If we do not notice changes but our loved ones do, what else are we missing?

If you want more science in Mild Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy check out the internet but be warned, most if not all of the medical case studies refer to HARD Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy which is completely different to mild. Most of the info on mild has been copied and pasted from a few major sites on HARD therapy so this obviously taints the info which is why I chose giving my personal opinion instead of a whole bunch of well conceived and placed words which are actually falsely misleading when they are using HARD therapies medical doctrine to promotes MILD’s benefits.

I wish I could point you in the right direction for medial research data on MILD’s benefits but I cannot. All I can say is that it works for me, thousands of professional athletes like Lebron James, professional cyclists sleep in them, home doctors have “cured” loved ones, tens maybe hundreds of thousands of regular folk swear by the benefits and I am becoming one of those.

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Mild Oxygen Hyperbaric Therapy at the Stevenson’s & what does it do? was originally published at LINK


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Why you gotta bounce

When we bounce on the trampoline we are working calisthenics (using our own bodyweight) and against the constant force of gravity, which runs resistance through all 50 trillion cells of our body. As you are reading this, also consider that “weight”, by definition, is mass X acceleration.  Rebounding offers 2 extra forces related to velocity […]

When we bounce on the trampoline we are working calisthenics (using our own bodyweight) and against the constant force of gravity, which runs resistance through all 50 trillion cells of our body. As you are reading this, also consider that “weight”, by definition, is mass X acceleration. 

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Rebounding offers 2 extra forces related to velocity or change of velocity and the forces are called acceleration and deceleration. (Uses car driving analogy accelerator and braking to decelerate) Generally these forces run along straight, linear pathways, in rebounding we manipulate them to travel vertically or straight up. This, along with the other forces of gravity and velocity variables introduces the physiology to a whole new environment it must adapt to.

Traditionally, working vertically can be eventually problematic as the only other modalities are basically running and sports which require many years of technique and are often difficult to reach high exertion levels due to the potential damage these activities are known for (i.e. knee, back & foot issues). Rebounding takes all that away due to the mat & spring system, allowing the user to reach high levels of output/exertion without the compounding damage of a hard surface.

An important part rebounding plays is working relatively unknown part of our physiology called the lymphatic system. The lymphatic system is a system of tubes that start in the toes and fingertips and work up throughout the entire body. It is filled with one way valves which makes it so the lymph fluid only flows in one direction. The lymphatic system is sometimes known as the internal vacuum cleaner of the body. It has the capability of sucking up toxins, poisons, trash and metabolic waste making it possible for the oxygen and nutrients to get in and bathe the cells. The way to turn on the lymphatic system is by activating the one way valves , and the way you activate those valves is by an “up and down” activity or vigorous movement. Rebounding is one of the most efficient ways of achieving this.

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Because of the elevated lymphatic system activity, rebounding acts as a “cleansing” exercise which in our opinion places this style in a class of its own. The next key benefit of rebounding is the aerobic work, or the ability to breathe deeply and take in greater quantities of oxygen which has many profound and far reaching crossovers too many to list here. Next we come to the resistance, which comes in the form of gravity. Because gravity is an invisible force which passes through all 50 trillion cells of the body, each one of these must contract in order “keep the body together” so to speak (If a cluster of these cells were NOT to contract, they would float away in space and time!).

Training the body on a cellular level creates elevates effects such as the connective tissues and muscles become stronger and work as a compete unit, the vital organs get conditioned allowing them to function more efficiently due to the increased lymph fluid activity. We also get to stimulate  the balancing mechanisms of the body; the vestibular system, the anti-gravity muscles and the proprioceptors of the joints, so that you develop a greater sense of balance, coordination, rhythm, timing dexterity, and kinaesthetic awareness. Because of all these benefits, we have found that the entire body will function much easier.

Point of the story, if you have a history of eating “garbage” food, your “garbage collectors” are regulated by the lymphatic system. The easiest way to stimulate this system into action is rebounding. What are you waiting for? Get bouncing!

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Why you gotta bounce was originally published at LINK


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