Arnold Schwarzenegger’s ‘Golden Six’ routine for building strength and size – Fitness and Power and More…

In today’s digest we bring you articles on Arnold Schwarzenegger’s ‘Golden Six’ routine for building strength and size – Fitness and Power, Are Low-carb and Keto Diets Healthy for Bones? – Diet Doctor, 6 Reasons You’re Not Losing Fat and Luke Richardson Wins Europe’s Strongest Man 2020. Hope you enjoy them…

Arnold Schwarzenegger’s ‘Golden Six’ routine for building strength and size – Fitness and Power

In the pre-Internet era, sources of information concerning bodybuilding were scant, mostly in the form of bodybuilding and fitness magazines and books written by the great bodybuilding champions, the greatest one being Arnold Schwarzenegger, of course. Many of his routines published in magazines were body-part split routines he used in the 60s and 70s. However, […]

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In today’s digest we bring you articles on Arnold Schwarzenegger’s ‘Golden Six’ routine for building strength and size – Fitness and Power, Are Low-carb and Keto Diets Healthy for Bones? – Diet Doctor, 6 Reasons You’re Not Losing Fat and Luke Richardson Wins Europe’s Strongest Man 2020. Hope you enjoy them…

Arnold Schwarzenegger’s ‘Golden Six’ routine for building strength and size – Fitness and Power

In the pre-Internet era, sources of information concerning bodybuilding were scant, mostly in the form of bodybuilding and fitness magazines and books written by the great bodybuilding champions, the greatest one being Arnold Schwarzenegger, of course. Many of his routines published in magazines were body-part split routines he used in the 60s and 70s. However, […]

In the pre-Internet era, sources of information concerning bodybuilding were scant, mostly in the form of bodybuilding and fitness magazines and books written by the great bodybuilding champions, the greatest one being Arnold Schwarzenegger, of course. Many of his routines published in magazines were body-part split routines he used in the 60s and 70s. However, the majority of these routines were for intermediate and advanced lifters who had already built up a solid strength base and were, therefore, useless for beginners.

These were usually high-volume routines with lots of sets and reps, which while no doubt would have been effective for someone using anabolic s******s and had above average genetics, would have been futile for a 16-year old guy weighing barely 140 pounds and whose diet primarily consisted of burgers and cakes.

Most beginners do the same mistake during their first gym sessions of trying to do the exact same routine used by professional bodybuilders, in the hopes this would magically transform their physique into that of a Greek statue. However, this was not the way Arnold first started out in the gym, nor the way he made most of his physique. Even though Arnold is famous for the high-volume body split routines he published in various Weider magazines when he first started training he emulated the training philosophy of his idol and future mentor, the legend Reg Park.

Arnold said that he had found out everything he could about his idol and bought all the magazines containing his training programs. He said he had learned how Reg started training, what he ate, about his lifestyle and the way he performed his workouts. He practically became obsessed.

The Austrian Oak managed to build his strength foundation by performing full-body training such as Park’s 5×5 strength routine and later his own “Golden Six” routine which we’re going to look into in this article. By the time he won his first ‘Mr. Olympia’ title, when Arnold started using anabolic s******s and had increased his training volume and intensity, he had already succeeded in building an imposing physique by using these basic full body workout routines as its main base.

The ‘Golden six’ routine

This routine was a training program consisting of 6 key movements which Arnold did when he started training at a gym in Munich and according to him, one of the programs that he made “remarkable” muscle and strength gains on. Also, this was the workout routine which he prescribed for all of his personal training clients who were also on a quest to “get huge”.

Arnold claimed that Welsh bodybuilder and former Mr. World Paul Grant used this workout routine and gained more than 60 lbs of lean muscle mass in little less than a year. His progression was in the form of a gradual increase of the number sets in the first 5 movements, moving up to 4 sets after 3 months and then 6 sets after 6 months.

We should take into consideration, however, that this is the same man who, when attempting to get his first movie role, convinced the producers that he had done Shakespeare back in Austria, so one needs to take everything he says with a grain of salt. Here’s the lineup for the ‘Golden six’ exercises:

 

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Arnold Schwarzenegger’s ‘Golden Six’ routine for building strength and size – Fitness and Power was originally published at LINK


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Are Low-carb and Keto Diets Healthy for Bones? – Diet Doctor

By , medical review by – Posted September 7, 2020 For many, a reduction in bone health, strength, and density is an all too common part of the aging process. Fortunately, several healthy lifestyle habits, including a low-carb or keto diet, can potentially slow or even reverse bone loss as you age. Because many variables […]

For many, a reduction in bone health, strength, and density is an all too common part of the aging process. Fortunately, several healthy lifestyle habits, including a low-carb or keto diet, can potentially slow or even reverse bone loss as you age.

Because many variables are associated with bone health, it helps to know and understand how to maintain healthy bones as we age.


What is bone health and why is it so important?

Bone is a constantly changing living tissue, even though its hardened appearance may make you think otherwise. Bones are mostly made up of collagen, a protein which provides the soft framework, and calcium phosphate, which adds strength and hardens the framework.

Bones play many important functions in the body, such as providing structure and scaffolding for your body, allowing you to move, anchoring muscles, storing calcium, and protecting your organs (e.g., brain, heart) from injury.

In your late teens to early 20s, your bones achieve their “peak bone mass,” meaning that your body has the greatest amount of bone.

Lifestyle habits — especially diet and exercise, and especially during the period of bone growth in childhood through young adulthood — can influence your peak bone mass by approximately 20 to 40%. Around midlife, you will likely start to lose bone as part of the aging process unless you incorporate several important lifestyle habits. Since bone loss is “silent,” most people are unaware that they are losing bone.

Unfortunately, poor bone health later in life increases your risk of fracture and frailty, which can have a profound effect on your independence and quality of life. That is why it pays to prioritize bone health as you age.


What conditions are associated with poor bone health?

As bones start to slowly thin out with age, they can become less dense, more brittle, and more likely to break. When this process is accelerated, it can result in osteopenia (low bone mass) or osteoporosis (severe bone loss). Osteoporosis afflicts approximately 200 million people worldwide. This condition leads to more than 8.9 million fractures every year, and an osteoporotic fracture occurs every 3 seconds around the world.

How do you know if you have poor bone health? Bone health can be measured using a bone scan machine called DEXA, short for dual x-ray absorptiometry. This machine measures the density of your bones. If your density values are lower than the normal ranges for you age and gender, you may be diagnosed as having osteopenia or osteoporosis.

Increasing evidence shows that several other conditions may be associated with osteoporosis and fracture risk, such as type 2 diabetes, sarcopenic obesity (having more body fat than muscle), and Alzheimer’s disease.

This does not mean that one causes the other, but this does suggest that similar mechanisms, such as “inflammaging” (inflammation associated with aging) may be involved in the development of each of these diseases.

Future research will hopefully help us better understand these relationships.


Are you at risk for poor bone health?

We can divide the many factors associated with bone growth and bone loss into two categories: nonmodifiable and modifiable.

Examples of the nonmodifiable risk factors — meaning you cannot change them — are age, gender, heredity, and ethnicity or race. Research shows that being female, having a genetic predisposition, and being Caucasian or Asian all increase your risk for accelerated, age-related bone loss. Although you cannot do anything to change these factors, you can focus on your modifiable variables to help keep your bones healthy.

Modifiable variables are ones you can change during your lifetime to help prevent or slow age-related bone loss. Most of these variables are associated with lifestyle, such as diet, exercise, smoking habits, and alcohol intake. Good nutrition — as well as staying active, not smoking, and avoiding heavy drinking — can help to keep your bones strong as you age.

Even though a large amount of research has explored lifestyle factors, many questions remain. Let’s take a look at them, so you can start making informed choices about how to keep your bones healthy.


Will taking calcium and Vitamin D supplements or eating foods rich in these nutrients protect your bones?

For many years, calcium and vitamin D supplements were touted as two of the best ways to protect your bones.

Early clinical trials suggested a potential benefit of calcium and vitamin D supplementation on bone health.

However, more recent studies only suggest a very small, if any, benefit to bone. Studies have also looked at the associations of dietary calcium and vitamin D from the natural foods we eat, and the findings are comparably modest.

In 2018, the US Preventive Services Task Force took a look at all the research to date and concluded that current evidence does not support calcium or vitamin D supplementation for prevention of fractures in men and women.

So, where does this leave us in regards to calcium and vitamin D? Researchers still think that vitamin D may play some role in bone health, and vitamins C and D also are important for proper functioning of many other body systems.

However, there is growing concern that too much supplemental calcium may actually be harmful to cardiovascular health, and very high vitamin D intake can be potentially toxic (although it is rare to reach these levels).

Therefore, incorporating natural sources of calcium from foods — such as dairy products, fatty fish, and leafy green vegetables — may be the safer choice for healthy aging and bone health.

If you are currently taking or plan to start taking calcium and/or vitamin D supplements to help your bones, it is best to consult with your physician, and consider if you can get adequate amounts from food alone.


What other nutrients may help keep your bones healthy?

Can other nutrients besides calcium and vitamin D help your bones? The answer is maybe.

It is important to understand that there are no definitive answers whether a specific nutrient will improve bone health, mainly due to the limitations in nutrition research. However, a few other nutrients have been identified as potentially important for our bones and may help to prevent bone loss.

Protein

Let’s take a look at protein. Remember that collagen, which makes up the soft framework of your bones, is a protein.

Research suggests a clear association between higher protein intake and improved bone health. The most recent review of the literature shows that a high protein intake (greater than current recommended levels of 0.8  g/kg body weight/day) may be beneficial for the maintenance of bone health and the prevention of bone loss in older adults.

Current research also suggests that higher levels of protein are needed as you age to prevent an age-related condition known as sarcopenia, the loss of muscle mass, strength, and function and, ultimately, independence.

The evidence for protein’s effect on bone and muscle health is very promising.

Vitamins and minerals

Three other nutrients worthy of mention are vitamin K, magnesium, and potassium.

The current evidence for vitamin K suggests a beneficial role in bone health (with more evidence supporting K2), but findings from studies lack consistency.

The evidence for magnesium, and potassium is promising, but more research is needed to come to any conclusions because research is limited to observational data.

It appears that these nutrients may be important for helping maintain your bones, but it’s very difficult to link one specific nutrient to a specific outcome, in this case, bone health. One of the main reasons is that we eat foods that usually contain a variety of nutrients that interact with each other, so it’s hard to separate out the specific effects of a single nutrient.

More recent studies have started to look at the relationship between whole foods, food groups, and dietary patterns (vs single nutrients), and results are favorable for nutrient-rich green leafy vegetables and dairy intake.

On the other hand, a Western-style diet — which includes energy-dense, nutrient-poor foods, such as refined carbohydrates and highly processed snack foods — is associated with lower bone density.

So, what’s the take-home message?

Aim to eat a healthy and nutrient-rich diet that includes plenty of dairy products and protein as well as plant-based foods rich in vitamin K, magnesium and potassium, such as leafy greens, avocados, and berries — which are all part of a low-carb lifestyle, as we discuss more below.


What type of exercise is best for bone health?

An active life is beneficial for both mental and physical health. Exercise has numerous benefits, and its effects on bone health are well documented for both preventing bone loss as well as treatment for conditions associated with poor bone health.

The evidence to date suggests that a progressive strength-training program, which places increasing amounts of mechanical load on the bones, is required to stimulate bone growth showing small but significant gains in bone density.

Studies also found that although walking doesn’t have a large impact on bone growth, it can help to prevent bone loss.

Taken together, these findings suggest that you should combine regular physical activity, such as walking, with a strength-training program to maximize bone health.

It is important to note that when starting a new exercise program, you should consult with your doctor and a trained fitness professional if possible, especially if you have osteopenia or osteoporosis.


What are the effects of a low-carb or keto diet on bone health?

This is a question that many low-carb followers wonder about. To date, only a few studies have looked at the association between low-carb diets and bone health but so far, results are overall encouraging.

Yet the findings are not uniformly positive. One small clinical trial suggested that a ketogenic diet may be detrimental to bone. However the study had several weaknesses in the methodology, which makes the findings questionable.

Conversely, larger and longer trials that use bone density as a measure of long-term bone health have shown adults and children maintain bone health on low-carb diets. By studying a broader population for longer periods of time and with more reliable outcome measures, these trials seem to be more helpful in determining the bone effects of low-carb diets.

Future studies hopefully shed more light on the association between low-carb diets and long-term bone health.

Protein

Let’s revisit the issue of protein as it relates to a low-carb diet. It has been suggested that moderate to higher amounts of protein intake on a low-carb or keto diet may have an adverse effect on bone due to the potential increased acidity from protein-rich foods. This “acid-alkaline” myth suggests that higher protein levels can lead to high acid levels in the body, thereby increasing calcium loss from the bone to “buffer” the high acidity. However, at this point, it is truly a myth and has not been supported by science.

Conclusion

Emerging research supports the idea that low-carb diets may actually improve our bones. For starters, low-carb diets can reduce inflammation, and researchers have proposed that inflammation may be associated with the development of osteoporosis.

We also know that well-formulated low-carb or keto diets emphasize the consumption of protein and nutrient-rich vegetables, which evidence suggests are important for bone health as well as overall health. No convincing evidence as of yet shows that low-carb or keto diets have any harmful effects on bone, and the new accumulating research suggests the opposite may be true.

A well-balanced, low-carb or keto diet that includes adequate amounts of high-quality protein, calcium-rich foods, and nutrient-dense vegetables may not only help keep your bones strong but help keep your body healthier as you age.



Are Low-carb and Keto Diets Healthy for Bones? – Diet Doctor was originally published at LINK


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6 Reasons You’re Not Losing Fat

You treat your workouts like another job. You’re seemingly focused, determined, and anxiously working toward the physique results you desire. But when you look in the mirror, your muscle definition is lackluster and overall soft. There are plenty of possible culprits, but some are more likely than others.  Look out for these six underlying saboteurs […]

You treat your workouts like another job. You’re seemingly focused, determined, and anxiously working toward the physique results you desire. But when you look in the mirror, your muscle definition is lackluster and overall soft. There are plenty of possible culprits, but some are more likely than others. 

Look out for these six underlying saboteurs that could be contributing to your lack of gains.



6 Reasons You’re Not Losing Fat was originally published at LINK


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Luke Richardson Wins Europe’s Strongest Man 2020

Well, well, well….talk about expecting the unexpected. This weekend’s ESM contest was plagued by athletes pulling out due to injuries, retirements, travel restrictions, or preparations for WUS’ second season of feats of strength. However, this meant the up and comers could perhaps shake some things up and score a big win. Which is exactly what […]

Well, well, well….talk about expecting the unexpected. This weekend’s ESM contest was plagued by athletes pulling out due to injuries, retirements, travel restrictions, or preparations for WUS’ second season of feats of strength. However, this meant the up and comers could perhaps shake some things up and score a big win. Which is exactly what happened, with Luke Richardson scoring a major trophy at only 23 years old in his second pro Strongman show.

Also, if I am not mistaken this is the first International Strongman show that’s taken place since these pesky lockdowns started to take place. Of course, since it was held without an audience it was seriously lacking the spectacle factor but the guys are pros and they did their job. At this moment, there is still not a lot of information about who were the winners going event by event but some information did get out from the official “Giants Live” page.

The grip titan, Mark Felix, set another Hercules Hold record, shattering the previous one he set last year. At the 2019 Europe’s Strongest Man he held the Hercules Hold for 87.52 seconds and this weekend he held it for 92.37 seconds with plenty of left in the tank. Some guys are just born with an industrial level hydraulic press in their palms. If Mark continues his reign of terror in the Hercules Hold events, I would really suggest that the event be renamed “The Felix Hold” at for the Giants Live events. He deserves to be part of history.

Next up, is last year’s Britain’s Strongest Man, Graham Hicks. Graham has been an up and comer for some time now and he’s always somewhere around top 5 with placings differing depending on the competitors line up. Graham is part of a growing list of Strongman who are specializing in the log lift with dreams of being the first guy not named “Big Z” to set a log lift world record. Luke Stoltman, Rob Kearney, Rob Oberst, Iron Biby, and Hixxy all guys capable of pressing +220kg overhead. Hixxy was aiming for a new British log lift record of 220kg which he lifted fairly easy. After he was done with that he tried his hand on a world record of 230kg but he just didn’t have it in him this time. Hixxy will have to wait for another contest and try his luck.

And lastly, we have the newly crowned King of Europe, the British rookie Luke Richardson. I think it’s safe to say Luke surprised everyone by winning in his first big international show. Obviously it helped that Thor is getting ready to beat Eddie Hall and guys like the Stoltman brothers and Mateusz Kiels aren’t competing for various reasons. However, that’s not Luke’s problem, because he trained his ass off, came to the event with the intention of winning and did so. Everything else is just pure speculation and Captain Hindsight vision. Luke Richardson is very young and has a lot of potential for growth. The next big event with some name value competitors(Shaw, Mateusz, Martins, Stoltmans) will show where ranks among the best and how fast can he catch up to them. 

Luke Richardson

Luke Richardson

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Luke Richardson Wins Europe’s Strongest Man 2020 was originally published at LINK


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